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Links to my published articles online
List of Publications with Full Citations

2006
Adolescent Diary Weblogs and the Unseen Audience

2005
Conversations in the Blogosphere: An Analysis "from the Bottom Up". Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-38) Best Paper Nominee.

Weblogs as a bridging genre

2004
Bridging the Gap: A Genre Analysis of Weblogs. Winner of the 2004 EduBlog Awards as best paper.

Common Visual Design Elements of Weblogs

Women and Children Last: The Discursive Construction of Weblogs

Time until my next publication submission deadline
27 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


Links to my conference papers online
2005
The Performativity of Naming: Adolescent Weblog Names as Metaphor

2004
Buxom Girls and Boys in Baseball Hats: Adolescent Avatars in Graphical Chat Spaces

Time until my next conference submission deadline
31 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


Bibliographies
Adolescents and Teens Online Bibiliography
Last updated July 8, 2005.

Weblog and Blog Bibliography
Last Updated November 22, 2005.

My CiteULike Page

My Book2
New books are added but reading status is rarely accurate.


November 22, 2005

Inter-discipline and Punishment...is it required?

Confessions of a Community College Dean has an excellent post that cuts to the heart of some of the issues/fears I and many of my colleagues share about in our upcoming (forth coming) job searches. In essence the issue is how to package ourselves so that departments see the value of interdisciplinarity rather then the fact that the peg doesn't fit squarely in the hole.

For myself I have been so lucky this year to spend time in a department were my weird and wacky view of the academic world, and disciplinary boundaries, has not only been accepted but has been nurtured. Nothing like having to tell you associate dean that you can't apply for the hefty university grant to do the cutting-edge-interdisciplinary project that for the last couple of years you've been dreaming of sinking your teeth into all because you simply have to finish quals...I could get used to this, I want to get used to this.

As Richard Bauman told me several years ago, "You have a healthy disrespect for disciplinary boundaries." I treasure that characterization...it's true and it's healthy to boot. I think there is an academic home out there for me and for you as well...we just have to be honest about who we are and what environments help us to thrive, then look for those places.

Folks of an interdisciplinary bent seem to find homes on the extremes: either very large places, or very small ones. Very large ones often have 'centers' that focus on particular subject areas without disciplinary boundaries. Very small ones need people who can cover multiple fields, since they're so short-staffed. It's the mediocre middle that won't know what to do with you.

If you manage to break in, though, you will have a higher ceiling than your more traditional peers. Unlike most others, you'll be able to talk across fields. You'll have at least a glancing familiarity with the ways in which other disciplines see the world. Although you may have a hard time getting that first job, the path to management should be easier, if you should choose to take it.

(That's why so many baseball managers are former catchers. Broadly speaking, there are two camps in baseball: hitters and pitchers. Hitters don't understand or like pitchers, and pitchers don't understand or like hitters. Catchers have to understand and like both to succeed. Catchers aren't usually the star players, but they're disproportionately represented in managerial ranks, since they alone can talk across camps.)

In the short term, I'd recommend focusing on the extremes, and emphasizing range. Show the small school that can't hire very many people what a bargain it's getting by hiring someone with range. They tend to care less about fashion, anyway. At my old school, when I was on faculty, I taught courses in several different disciplines; that's what got me the job in the first place (and that exposure has been invaluable as an administrator). It will make for a tricky and often frustrating search, but the long-term payoff could be quite high. Good luck out there!

Posted by prolurkr at November 22, 2005 05:40 PM

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