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Links to my published articles online
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2006
Adolescent Diary Weblogs and the Unseen Audience

2005
Conversations in the Blogosphere: An Analysis "from the Bottom Up". Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-38) Best Paper Nominee.

Weblogs as a bridging genre

2004
Bridging the Gap: A Genre Analysis of Weblogs. Winner of the 2004 EduBlog Awards as best paper.

Common Visual Design Elements of Weblogs

Women and Children Last: The Discursive Construction of Weblogs

Time until my next publication submission deadline
27 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


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2005
The Performativity of Naming: Adolescent Weblog Names as Metaphor

2004
Buxom Girls and Boys in Baseball Hats: Adolescent Avatars in Graphical Chat Spaces

Time until my next conference submission deadline
31 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


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Adolescents and Teens Online Bibiliography
Last updated July 8, 2005.

Weblog and Blog Bibliography
Last Updated November 22, 2005.

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My Book2
New books are added but reading status is rarely accurate.


February 01, 2005

American adolescents reject something they do not directly experience - the First Amendment

From the BBC: US teens 'reject' key freedoms, other news outlets have carried the same material.

Over a third of the 100,000 students questioned felt the First Amendment went "too far" in guaranteeing freedom of speech, press, worship and assembly.

Only half felt newspapers should be allowed to publish stories that did not have the government's approval.

A primary cause behind this is that American teens do not live under the First Amendment in the same way American adults do. Court cases have consistently found that schools and municipalities can limit rights of student in favor of control issues, i.e. school newspapers can be, and usually are, censored for topics so as not to offend parents, or inflame or upset students.

I should add that in my experience talking to teens in online venues, their understanding of the First Amendment is often inaccurate in that they believe that they have the right to say anything they think and no one can do anything about it. The understanding that the First Amendment is actually fairly narrow is news to them.

I have to agree that part of the answer to this issue is clearer instruction at several points in the curriculum. But unlike the authors I don't put that solely in the hands of the schools. I think we need much more public discourse on how structures like the Constitution and Amendments frame our way of life. I actually think adults need to be talking about these issues too.

Posted by prolurkr at February 1, 2005 07:01 AM

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