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Links to my published articles online
List of Publications with Full Citations

2006
Adolescent Diary Weblogs and the Unseen Audience

2005
Conversations in the Blogosphere: An Analysis "from the Bottom Up". Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-38) Best Paper Nominee.

Weblogs as a bridging genre

2004
Bridging the Gap: A Genre Analysis of Weblogs. Winner of the 2004 EduBlog Awards as best paper.

Common Visual Design Elements of Weblogs

Women and Children Last: The Discursive Construction of Weblogs

Time until my next publication submission deadline
27 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


Links to my conference papers online
2005
The Performativity of Naming: Adolescent Weblog Names as Metaphor

2004
Buxom Girls and Boys in Baseball Hats: Adolescent Avatars in Graphical Chat Spaces

Time until my next conference submission deadline
31 March 2006 23:59:59 UTC-0500


Bibliographies
Adolescents and Teens Online Bibiliography
Last updated July 8, 2005.

Weblog and Blog Bibliography
Last Updated November 22, 2005.

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My Book2
New books are added but reading status is rarely accurate.


July 21, 2004

Coding research and printing reports that will be presented next week at Digital Generations: Children, young people and new media

Line drawing of a women at a desk circa 1900I spent today coding adolescent blogs in preparation for my presentation next week at the Digital Generations: Children, Young People and New Media Conference. Has been a long and interesting day while I read the entire front page of the adolescent blogs in this dataset. I am coding for demographic information, narrator information (perspective, tone, and reliability), and type of audience addressed in each post. My research for this presentation is looking for a pattern of types of audience that are addressed within the same blog. I have a three more blogs to code out in the morning and then I can start crunching numbers, its a very small dataset so the numbers should fall together fairly quickly. Then I can plug it all into a PowerPoint presentation and I'm good to go.

The BBC News World Service had an article today titled Parents 'under-estimate' net risks, about Sonia Livingstone and Magdalena Bober's work UK Children Go Online: Surveying the experiences of young people and their parents. The report will be presented at Digital Generations and at AoIR so I printed out a copy of both the 2004 and 2003 works to read before the conference. It's always is a good thing to have a question to ask at conferences so you can introduce yourself. Which is something I need to do at this conference. I'm usually more then a bit shy at these things, never sure I have anything to add to the conversation. Though if I make myself dive in I almost always find common ground for discussion. That's what I need to do since this is a gathering of academics almost all of whom have research areas that align with mine in some way.

Full citations for the Livingstone & Bober are:

Livingstone, S. & Bober, M. (2004). UK Children Go Online: Surveying the experiences of young people and their parents. London: Economic & Social Research Council.

Livingstone, S. & Bober, M. (2003). UK Children Go Online: Listening to young people's experiences. London: Economic & Social Research Council.

Posted by prolurkr at July 21, 2004 01:58 AM

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